Chryslis CIC T/A Autizma

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Provider Reference Number (UKPRN)  : 10063855

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Please give us your views on autism training

 

Manchester Autism Training Mapping Exercise

Manchester Health and Care Commissioning is a partnership between NHS Manchester Clinical Commissioning Group and Manchester City Council.

Manchester Health and Care Commissioning is committed to the Making Greater Manchester Autism Friendly Strategy and the identified need for better autism training across the region.

 

Manchester Health and Care Commissioning wishes to understand more about the current health and social care autism training provision available in Manchester and have requested an autism mapping exercise be undertaken by Autizma, who is a Manchester third sector organisation who specialise in autism related work. Autizma is a partner of the Manchester Autism Partnership Board and the Greater Manchester Autism Consortium Partnership Board. 

 

Survey timescales

Start date:  10 July 2019   Close date:   30 August 2019

It is anticipated that the findings will be available in August 2019 and shared with the Manchester Autism Partnership Board thereafter.

 

How to share your views

We have a created a survey for Manchester health and social care organisations to share their views.  We have produced a recommended information document which will help when you complete the survey.  The recommended information can be found further down this page, or it can be emailed to you.

 

The survey should take no longer than 5 minutes to complete.  

 

How to complete the survey

By completing the online questionnaire. https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/7TGBYYN

Sending an email to info@autizma.co.uk and requesting an electronic or hard copy word document questionnaire to be sent to you.

 

Writing to request a questionnaire from: Autizma, The Centre, The Harpurhey Neighbourhood Project, Carrisbook Street, Harpurhey, Manchester, M9 5UX

 

Telephone: 07956 002 933 (between 9am to 5pm)

We would like to thank you for taking the time to complete the survey and below recommended information.  Your support and help to make Manchester an autism friendly place to live and work is appreciated.

Recommended Information

1.    Purpose of this document

In March 2019, the first ever Greater Manchester Autism Strategy was launched by the Greater Manchester Autism Consortium (GMAC): ‘Making Greater Manchester Autism Friendly’ 2019-2022.  The Autism Strategy is for “autistic people”; children, young people and adults.  The current Autism Strategy is for ages 14+, however, by 2021 this will include children and young people and will become an all age autism strategy.

Throughout this document and survey, we use identity-first terminology (“autistic people” rather than “people with autism”) when referring to autistic people - children, young people and adults. This reflects research published in the Autism journal in 2015 which looked at the preferences of people on the autism spectrum, their families, friends and professionals around the language used to describe autism. The research was conducted by The National Autistic Society, the Royal College of GPs and the UCL Institute of Education.

 

The Autism Act 2009 makes clear expectations on Manchester Health and Care Commissioning, which is a partnership between NHS Manchester Clinical Commissioning Group and Manchester City Council, to plan and commission appropriate services for autistic people and their families.  At the core of this work, among other duties (please see Appendix 1), are duties for every local area to have an autism training plan to make sure that staff across the health and care sector have training that is appropriate to their roles and specific community care assessors training.

Manchester Health and Care Commissioning is committed to the Making Greater Manchester Autism Friendly Strategy and the identified need for better autism training across the region.  The Strategy makes clear expectations to meet statutory duties and identify the delivery of training that may be appropriate in partnership across locality areas.

 

Manchester Health and Care Commissioning wishes to understand more about the current health and social care autism training provision available in Manchester and have requested an autism mapping exercise be undertaken by Autizma, who is a Manchester third sector organisation who specialise in autism related work.  Autizma is a partner of the Manchester Autism Partnership Board and the Greater Manchester Autism Consortium Partnership Board. 

The autism mapping exercise will be a time limited project that will aim to understand the different levels of autism training provision available in Manchester for health and social care staff.  A final summary document will share the mapping findings with members of the Manchester Autism Partnership Board. 

 

The mapping will include postcode information on the current picture of available autism training delivered in Manchester for the health and social care workforce; this information will also be used to create a new Autism training directory for Manchester’s health and social care sector.

It is anticipated that at the end of the mapping exercise that the Manchester Autism Partnership Board will determine the best way to deliver autism training at a local level and in partnership with Greater Manchester Autism Consortium partners.  

 

2.    Background

There is already an expectation in the statutory guidance of the Autism Act 2009 for local authorities and health organisations to ensure that those working in health and social care will have not only general autism awareness training but different levels of specialist training for staff in working a range of roles where this is needed to fulfil their responsibilities and for those who wish to develop their knowledge of autism.  

Every Local Authority, National Health Service (NHS) bodies and National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trusts should:

ü    Ensure autism awareness training is included within general equality and diversity training programmes for all staff working in health and care;

ü    Ensure that all autism awareness training enables staff to identify potential signs of autism and understand how to make reasonable adjustments in their behaviour, communication and services for people who have a diagnosis of autism or who display these characteristics;

ü   Ensure that there is a comprehensive range of local autism training that meets National Institute for Health and Care Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines for those staff who are likely to have contact with adults with autism;

ü   Ensure those in posts whose career pathways are highly likely to include working with adults with autism (for example, personal assistants, occupational therapists, residential care workers, frontline health staff including all GPs and psychiatrists) have demonstrable knowledge and skills to:

ü   Use appropriate communication skills when supporting a person with autism.

 

References:

 

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE 2014) provides clinical guidelines for different conditions. There is a clinical guideline on the diagnosis and management of autism in adults and there is guidelines relating to children and young people.   

Health Education England Autism Core Competency Framework

Presently, Health Education England is leading the development of a national Autism Core Competency Education and Training Framework, due to be completed in mid-2019. The expectation is that this will provide a framework complementary to the Skills for Care, Learning Disabilities Core Skills Education and Training Framework, setting out the different levels of skills and competencies needed specifically to meet the needs of autistic people.

It is envisaged that this will inform the content of training and local determination of the appropriate level of training needed by staff in autism awareness.

 

Department of Health and Social Care 2019 review

The Department of Health and Social Care has recently undertaken a 2019 Learning Disability and Autism training consultation for health and care staff across England.  The consultation looked at many of the similarities between the challenges faced by autistic people, and a person with a learning disability in accessing health and social care.  

The consultation proposed that the content of mandatory training includes:  

• an understanding of what learning disability and autism mean for different individuals; 

• the skills to support and care for someone with a learning disability or an autistic person; 

• autism, and highlights the differences between autism and learning disability, as well as how autistic people, and people with a learning disability can both benefit from reasonable adjustments. 

 

The consultation proposed that employers should assess the level of training needed for each member of staff, based on their role, using the 3 Tiers of the Learning Disability Core Skills Education and Training Framework, and when available the new Autism Core Competency Education and Training Framework.

 

Skills for Care and Skills for Health - Autism skills and knowledge list, for workers in generic social care and health services

 

The Autism skills and knowledge list has been developed to help improve awareness of autism and skills among workers in generic health and social care services. The list was developed by the National Autistic Society and Skills for Care, and Skills for Health.

 

Every health or social care service should be ready to provide services to people with autism, or to their families or others who care for them. This Autism skills and knowledge list has been developed to help improve awareness of autism and skills among workers in generic health and social care services:

·         Universal – underpinning values and attitudes

·         Tier 1 - Basic Awareness

·         Tier 2 - Intermediate skills and knowledge

·         Tier 3 - Specialist development.

 

Equality Act 2010

The Equality Act 2010 places a legal duty on services to make reasonable adjustments for people who have a protected characteristic.  All service providers are required to do this on a case-by-case basis and failure to comply could constitute discrimination under the Act. The duty is also anticipatory: service providers need to think about what sort of reasonable adjustments can be made and how they are provided before needed, a point especially relevant in a health.

 

Mental Capacity Act 2005

One of the most important pieces of legislation for autistic people is the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (and associated legislation), which is fundamental to the ability of an individual to consent, and has implications for implicit attitudes and advocacy.  Any care giver who may need to determine capacity, or act in response to such a decision, would need to be fully aware of the Act and its implications, e.g. registered medical practitioners, clinicians, health and social care managers, approved mental health professionals, other health and social care staff. 

 

The Children and Families Act 2014

 

The Children and Families Act 2014 and its accompanying Code of Practice: is the statutory framework for health, education and social care services to work together to support children and young people who have special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). 

Good Practice in Autism Training

 

The National Autistic Society (2012) Good Practice in Autism Training: is a code of practice document that reflects on the variations existing in available training around autism. It aims to provide a context for the delivery of training and to ensure that this is based on knowledge and experience and reflects the best available evidence.  Please refer to Appendix 2.

Accessible Information Standard

All organisations that provide NHS care and/or publicly-funded adult social care are legally required to follow the Accessible Information Standard. The Standard sets out a specific, consistent approach to identifying, recording, flagging, sharing and meeting the information and communication support needs of patients, service users, carers and parents with a disability, impairment or sensory loss.

 

Frequently asked questions

Who needs to complete the survey?

 

Given the prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (estimated at 1%) it could be expected that staff working in all NHS and Social Care services would at some point in their period of employment, come across an individual with the health condition.  Within health and social care, there are services that more obviously require autism knowledge and skills, such as dentistry, where sensory factors may play a particularly important role in the individual’s experience.

Career pathways for health and social care staff that are highly likely to include working with autistic people can include for e.g.:

·         Diabetes or epilepsy nurses

·         Health visitors

·         Mental health staff

·         Occupational therapists

·         Personal assistants

·         Pharmacists

·         Residential care workers

·         Domiciliary and supported living care workers

·         School nurses.

 

Feedback from the Manchester autism community strongly suggests that an autism friendly service may have a significant impact on that person’s experience, whether a one-off dental or medical appointment or a period of stay in hospital.

 

What we would like to know about training provision?

We would like to find out about the current levels of autism training that you use to upskill staff in your organisation.  We include below the Skills for Health proposed framework which describes the different levels of autism training.

Tier 1: People that require a general understanding of autism and the support autistic people may need. 

 

Tier 2: People with responsibility for providing health, care and support for autistic people, but who could seek support from others for complex management or complex decision making.

 

Tier 3: Health and social care, and other professionals with a high degree of autonomy, able to provide care and support in complex situations and/or may lead services for autistic people. 

 

Where and how your autism training takes place?

We would like to find out where and how your training happens; is it delivered in-house by in-house trainers, or face to face by an external training provider, is it accessed online, or through a mix of different training providers and session formats. 

If you do provide autism training for your own/other organisations in Manchester we would also like to include your autism training information into a new Autism Training Directory for Manchester.  The training directory will list what level of training you provide and your organisation details such as organisation, address and contact details you provide.

 

Autism Community Focus Group meeting

 

Feedback will be gathered from the autism community during the autism training mapping exercise to gain further insight into how autistic people can feel more confident about a service providers training plan and skill levels of staff. 

Confidentiality

 

Your responses to the autism training survey will be treated confidentially and collated along with other survey respondents to identify key training themes and needs.  Any completed survey information you provide will be stored confidentially. 

Please note that the findings of the autism training mapping will be shared with other organisations across Greater Manchester as this work relates to the Greater Manchester Autism Consortium Strategy and Manchester Clinical Commissioning Group’s Autism Joint Strategic Needs Assessment, which in in development stage as part of the Manchester Autism Partnership Board’s work.  The results of the survey will also be used to produce a Manchester Autism Training Directory document.

 

When you submit your online survey response by clicking ‘Submit Response’ or returning your completed hard copy questionnaire you are providing us with permission to analyse and include your response in our mapping exercise results. 

Appendix 1

 

Autism Act 2009 duties and expectations

 

As a result of the Autism Act 2009, there are clear duties and expectations on local authorities and the NHS to plan and commission appropriate services for autistic adults and their families.   At the core of this, among other duties, there are duties on every local area to have:

 

1. A pathway to diagnosis for adults

2. A named joint commissioner/senior manager to lead commissioning of care and support services for autistic adults

3. A meaningful local autism partnership arrangement that brings together different organisations, services and stakeholders locally (including autistic adults) to set the direction of services locally

4. A means of collecting data and information on the needs of the local autistic population and inclusion of this information in the Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (JSNA) or similar strategic document

5. A joint commissioning plan for services for autistic adults based on the Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (JSNA) or similar local strategic planning tool or plan

6. A plan to make sure that staff across health and care have training in autism, appropriate to their roles.

7. Specific training in place for community care assessors.

 

Appendix 2

Good Practice in Autism Training - Checklist of good practice

 

There are clear written outline aims and objectives and learning outcomes.

·         Outcomes reflect the needs of the learners.

·         Content is clear, well presented and well written.

·         Content and aims are clarified and refined with commissioners before commencement.

·         Materials and media to be used: are appropriate to the training, are appropriate in terms of terminology, avoid patronising or disrespectful terminology, are up to date, contain references of any papers or research quoted.

·         Trainer profile is available with details of all relevant experience and expertise, qualifications and declarations of interest. References are available if requested.

·         Evaluation includes how well the training met expectations aulfilled the brieTrainers or commissioners ensure equipment and venue are or purpose.

·         Trainers are suitably qualified to deliver the content of the training and are suitably experienced in autism.

·         Trainers are suitably qualified and experienced in any additional specific technical aspect that they will be teaching.

·         Trainers are able to reflect and address any cultural, racial and locality related issues in their training.

·         Trainers will declare any interest in any product or service that may be promoted during the course of the training.

·         Trainers supply the credentials, qualifications and expertise of all trainers to be used to the commissioners of training in advance.

·         Trainers agree to independent evaluation of content and delivery, and will make use of feedback in the review of their training.

·         Trainers welcome critical evaluation and peer review of training. The opportunity for learners to provide this anonymously is essential.

·         There is a complaints procedure – informal and formal.

·         Costs are transparent and agreed ahead of the start of training.

·         Adequate insurance is in place.Survey Copyright © Autizma, July 2019